Commodity chains and global capitalism

As has been noted Henderson et al. Commodity Chains and Marketing Strategies: As it has emerged over the past decade, the global commod- ity chain research agenda is motivated largely by different interests and concerns.

The empirical insights afforded by research on the governance dimension of GCCs have helped flush out the mean- ing of the inter-firm network as an organizational form that is neither market nor hierarchy though it may exhibit characteristics of each.

Commodity Chains and Global Capitalism Gary Gereffi, Miguel Korzeniewicz 1 Rezension The current restructuring of the world-economy under global capitalism has further integrated international trade and production.

Global Capitalism and Commodity Chains: Looking Back, Going Forward

The paradigm that GCCs embody is a network-centered, historical approach that probes above and below the level of the nation-state to better analyze structure and change in the contemporary world. Special attention is paid to the most powerful or lead firms in an industry, which are also known as chain drivers, because of their influence over other chain participants and their presumed importance as potential agents of upgrading and development: What distinguishes the GVC approach from the GCC paradigm to which it is closely related is the greater influ- ence of the international business literature on its analysis of global production networks, as opposed to the more sociological orientation of the earlier GCC framework, and a more pronounced interest in the policy implications of chain research.

The policy implications of chain research are being more fully elaborated in the newest variant of chain research, the global value chain approach, which is discussed in the third section of this article. Accordingly, the world-systems camp considers the commodity chain a vital research location for the study of the capitalist world economy in its totality Wallerstein I conclude that closer attention to the larger institu- tional and structural environments in which commodity chains are embedded is needed in order to more fully inform Commodity chains and global capitalism understanding of the uneven social and developmental dynamics of contemporary capitalism at the global-local nexus.

Apparel Firms by Ian M. GCC analysis is principally concerned with under- standing how global industries are organized. Construction and Research by Terence K.

World-systems theorists understand commodity chains as consisting not only of the steps involved in the transformation of raw materials into final goods, but also as webs connecting that set of productive activities with the social reproduction of human labor power as a critical input into this process.

Each production site in the chain involves organizing the acquisition of necessary raw materials plus semifinished inputs, the recruitment of labor power and its provisioning, arranging transportation to the next site, and the construction of modes of distribution via markets and transfers and consumption.

The GCC framework allows the authors to pose questions about development issues, past and present, that are not easily handled by previous paradigms and to more adequately forge the macro-micro links between processes that are generally assumed to be discretely contained within global, national, and local units of analysis.

GCC researchers understand commodity chains as sets of inter-firm networks which connect manufacturers, suppliers and subcontractors in global industries to each other, and ulti- mately to international markets, and they are principally concerned with the question of how participation in commodity chains can facilitate industrial upgrading for developing country exporters.

Although most reviews of the GCC literature locate its intellectual origins in the world-systems orientation Dicken et al.

Gereffi identifies four dimensions with respect to which every commodity chain can be analyzed: The GCC orientation is similarly interested in the commodity chain as a construct that can move between and across different levels of analysis.A Commodity Chains Framework for Analyzing Global Industries Gary Gereffi Duke University [email protected] August 12, In global capitalism, economic activity is not only international in scope, it is also global in organization.

"Internationalization" refers to the geographic spread of economic activities across global commodity. Gereffi, G. () The organization of buyer-driven global commodity chains: How US retailers shape overseas production networks, in Gereffi, G., Korzeniewicz, M.

(eds) Commodity Chains and Global Capitalism (Westport, CT, Praeger). Gereffi, G. () The organization of buyer-driven global commodity chains: How US retailers shape overseas production networks, in Gereffi, G., Korzeniewicz, M.

(eds) Commodity Chains and Global Capitalism (Westport, CT, Praeger). global capitalism and commodity chains A commodity chain approach can contribute to this line of inquiry by allowing us to study how patterns of inequality between the global North and South.

Commodity Chains and Global Capitalism

The contributors to this volume explore and elaborate the global commodity chains (GCCs) approach, which reformulates the basic conceptual categories for analyzing new patterns of global organization and change.

Commodity Chains and Global Capitalism by Gary Gereffi The current restructuring of the world-economy under global capitalism has further integrated international trade and production.

Global Capitalism and Commodity Chains: Looking Back, Going Forward

It thus has brought to the fore the key role of commodity chains in the relationships of capital, labor, and states.

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Commodity chains and global capitalism
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